The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 15

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Quapropter moneo vos, uti sitis forti atque parato animo, et memineritis, cum inibitis praelium,

Therefore I advise you, that you may be with brave and prepared mind, and will have remembered, when you will enter the battle,

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vos portare divitias, decus, gloriam, praeterea libertatem atque patriam, In vestris dextris.

you to carry (that you carry) riches, honor, glory. besides liberty and country, so your right (hands).

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Si vincimus, omnia erunt tuta nobis; commeatus abunde, municipia et coloniae patebunt.

If we conquer, all (things) shall be safe to us; provisions abundantly, municipal-towns and colonies will be-open.

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Sin cesserimus metu, illa eadem fient advorsae. Neque quisquam locus neque amicus

But-if we shall have yielded by fear, those same (things) wil1 be made adverse. Neither any place nor friend

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teget, quem arma texerint non. Praeterea, milites, eadem

will cover (protect) (him), whom arms may have covered not. [Who had not protected himself by his arms.] Besides, soldiers, the same

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necessitudo non-impendet nobis et illis. Nos

necessity does not-impend to (over) us and them. We contend for (our) country, for liberty, for life:

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est supervacaneum illis pugnare pro potentia paucorum. Quo, memores pristinae virtutis,

it is useless to them to light for the power for a few. Wherefore, mindfull of pristine valor,

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aggredimini andacius. Licuit vobis agere aetatem in exsilio cum summa turpitudine:

attack (them) the more-boldly. It was lawful for you to act (spend your) age in exile [with] the utmost baseness:

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nonnulli potuistis, bonis amissis, exspectare alienas opes Romae: quia illa

some (of you) have been-able, (your) goods having been lost to look-to others' wealth at Rome: because those (things;

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videbantur foeda atque intoleranda viris, deerevistis sequi haec, Est opus audacia

did seem foul and intolerable [to men], you have resolved to follow these (my interests). (There) is need of boldness, (abl.),

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si vultis relinquere haec. Nemo, nisi victor, mutavit bellum pace. Nam sperare

if you will to leave (to complete) these. No-one, unless conqueror, has changed war with (for) peace, For to hope

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salutem in fuga, tum avertere ab hostibus, arma quis corpus tegitur, ea est vero dementia.

safety in flight, then to turn-away from the enemies, the arms by which the body is covered, that is indeed madness.

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Maxumum periculum est semper iis in praelio, qui timent maxume: audacia habetur pro muro.

The greatest danger is always to those in battle, who fear most: boldness is had (accounted) for a wall.

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Milites, cum considero vos, et cum aestumo vestra facta, magna spes victoriae tenet me. Animus,

Soldiers, When I consider you, and when I estimate your deeds, great hope of victory possesses me. (Your) mind,

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aetas, vestra virtus hortantur me: praeterea necessitudo, quae facit etiam timidos fortis (fortes). Nam

age, your valor encourage me: moreover, necessity, which makes even the cowardly brave. For

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angustiae loci prohibent, ne multitudo hostium queat circumvenire. Quod si fortuna inviderit

the defiles of the place prohibit, lest the multitude of the enemies may be-able to surround (us). But if fortune shall have envied

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vestrae virtuti, cavete, ne inulti amittatis animam; neu capti, trucidemini, sicuti pecora,

to your valor, beware, lest unrevenged you may lose life; nor taken, you may be slaughtered, as cattle,

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potius quam pugnantes more virorum, relinquatis cruentam atque luctuosam victoriam

rather than fighting in the manner of men, you may leave a bloody and mournful victor,

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hostibus. " Ubi dixit haec, commoratus paululum,

to the enemies," When be said these (words), having delayed a little,

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jubet signa canere, atque deducit ordines in aequum locum: dein, equis omnium remotis,

he orders the trumpets to sound, and leads-down the ranks to a level place: then, the horses all of having been removed,

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quo amplior animus esset militibus, periculo exaequato, ipse pedes instruit exercitum

in-order-that a greater mind (spirit) might be to the soldiers, the danger having been equaled, he on-foot arranges the army

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pro loco atque copiis. Nam, uti planities erat inter montis (montes) sinistros, et aspera rupes

according-to the situation and forces. For, as a plain between the mountains on-the-left, and a rugged rock

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ab dextera, constituit octo cohortes in fronte; collocat reliqua signa arctius in

from the right, he placed eight cohorts in front ; he arranges the remaining standards (divisions) more-closely in

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subsidiis. Subducit ab his in primam aciem, omnis (omnes) lectos, centuriones, et evocatos,

reserves. He draws-out from these into the first line, all the chosen, the centurions, and (those) called-out (veteran),

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praeterea quemque optume armatum ex gregariis militibus: jubet Caium Manlium curare

besides every beat armed (man) of in the common soldiers: be orders Caius Manlius to command on

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dextra parte, quemdam Faesulanum in sinistra: ipse adsistit cum libertis et colonis

the right part (wing), a certain Faesulan on the left. he stands with the freedmen and colonists [of Sylla's army]

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propter aquilam, quam Caius Mariua dicebatur habuisse in exercitu Cimbrico bello. At ex altera parte

near the eagle, which Caius Marius was said to have had in (his) army in the Cimbrian war. But from (on) the other side

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Caius Antonius, aeger pedibus, permittit exercitum Marco Petreio, legato, quod nequibat adesse

Caius Antony, diseased in feet, commits the army to Marcus Petreius, (his) lieutenant, because he was-unable to be-present

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praelio. Ille locat veteranas cohortes, quas conscripserat causa tumulti (tumultus),

to (at) the battle, He (Antony) places the veteran cohorts, Which he had levied by cause (on account) of the tumult,

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in fronte, caeterum exercitum post eas, in subsidiis. Ipse circumiens equo, nominans unumquemque,

in the front, the rest-of the army behind those, in reserves. himself (Petreius) going-about on horse, naming each-one,

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appellat, hortatur, rogat, uti meminerint se cernere contra inermes latrones,

addresses, encourages, asks (them), that they may have remembered (to remember) themselves to contend against unarmed robbers,

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pro patria, pro liberis, pro suis aris atque focis. Militaris homo, quod fuerat tribunus,

for [their] country, for [their] children, for their altars and hearths. (This) military man, because he had been tribune,

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aut praefectus, aut legatus, aut praetor, amplius triginta annos cum magna gloria in exercitu, noverat

or prefect, or lieutenant, [or praetor,] more (than) thirty years with great glory in the army, had known

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plerosque ipsos, que fortia facta eorum; accendebat animos militum commemorando ea. Sed ubi,

most-of them, and the brave deeds of them; he did kindle the spirits of the soldiers by recounting those (things), But when,

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omnibus rebus exploratis, Petreius dat signum tuba, jubet cohortes incedere paullatim.

all things having been explored, [Petreius] gives the signal by trumpet, (and) orders the cohorts to sdvance a little.

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Exercitus hostium facit idem. Postquam ventum est eo, unde praelium posset committi a

The army or the enemies does the same. After it was come they came) there, where the battle might be engaged-in by

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ferentariis, concurrunt maxumo clamore, infestis signis; omittunt pila; res geritur gladiis.

be light-armed, they rush with the greatest shout, with hostile standards; cast-aside the javelins; the affair is-carried-on with swords,

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Veterani, memores pristinae virtutis, instare acriter, cominus; illi haud timidi

The veterans, mindful of (their) pristine valor, (began) to press-on vigorously, hand-to-hand; they (the others) not fearful

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resistunt: certatur maxuma vi. Interea Catilina versari cum expeditis in prima.

resist: it is contended with the greatest force. Meantime Catiline (began) to be occupied with the light-armed in the first

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acie: succurrere laborantibus, accersere integros pro seuciis ; providere

line; to relieve (to those] laboring (hard-pressed), to summon (fresh (men) instead-of the wounded; to provide for

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omnia; ipse pugnare multum; saepe ferire hostem; exsequebatur simul officia

all (things); himself to fight much; often to strike the enemy; he did discharge at-the-same-time the duties

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strenui militis et boni imperatoris. Ubi Petreius videt Catilinam tendere magna vi,

of a vigorous soldier and of a good commander. When Petreius sees Catiline to strive with great force,

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contra ac ratus-erat, inducit praetoriam cohortem in medios hostis (hostes), interficit

otherwise than be had supposed, he leads-in the praetorian cohort into the middle-of the enemies, kills

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que eos perturbatos atque alios resistentes alibi: deinde aggreditur caeteros utrimque

both those disordered and others resisting elsewhere: afterwards he attacks the rest on-both-sides

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ex lateribus. Manlius et Faesulanus pugnantes in primis cadunt.

of the flanks. Manlius and the Foesulanus fighting in the first (the van) fall. [Fell fighting among the first.]

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Postquam Catilina videt copias fusas que se relictum cum paucis, memor generis atque suae

After-that Catiline saw (his) forces routed and himself left with a few, mindful or (his) race and his

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pristinae dignitatis, incurrit in confertissumos hostes, que ibi pugnans confoditur. Sed, praelio

ancient dignity, he rushes into the thickest enemies, and there fighting is run-through. But, the battle

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confecto, tum vero cerneres quanta. audacia, que quanta vis animi, fuisset (pl. sub.)

having been finished, then in-truth you might perceive how-great boldness, and how-great strength of mind, might have been (had been)

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in exercitu Catilinae. Nam quisque, anima amissa, fere tegebat corpore

in the army of Catiline. For every-one, (his) life being lost, almost (for the most part) did cover with (his) body

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locum, quem vivus ceperat pugnando. Autem pauci, quos medios, praetoria cohors

the place, which (when) alive he had taken in fighting. But as few, whom (being) middle, the praetorian cohort

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disjecerat, conciderant paulo diversius, sed omnes tamen adversis vulneribus.

had dispersed, had fallen a little more differently [more scattered] but all however with front wounds.

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Vero Catilina repertus-est inter cadavera. hostium longe a suis, etiam spirans paululum,

But Catiline was found among the dead-bodies of (his) enemies far from his own (men), even breathing a little,

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que retinens vultu ferociam animi, quam vivus habuerat. Postremo, quisquam

and retaining in [his] face the fierceness of mind, which (when) alive he had had. Finally, any-one

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ingenuus civis ex omni copia, neque captus-est in praelio, neque in fuga. Ita cuncti pepercerant

free-born citizen of all the force, neither was taken in the battle, nor so the flight. So all had spared

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suae que vitae hostium justa. Neque, tamen, exercitus Romani populi adeptus-erat laetam

to their-own and the life of enemies equally. [so little did all spare either their own life, or that of the enemy.] Neither, however, the army of the Roman people had obtained a joyful

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aut incruentam victoriam. Nam quisque strenuissi aut occiderat in praelio, aut

or bloodless victory, For each braveness (man) either had fallen [in] the engagement, or

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discesserat graviter vulneratus. Autem mul qui processerant e castris gratia

had departed severely wounded. But many,

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visundi aut spoliandi, volventes cadavera, reperiebant amicum, pars hospitem, aut cognatum.

of going-to-see or despoiling, rolling the dead-bodies, some did discover a friend, part a guest, or a relation.

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Fuere item, qui cognoscerent (imp. su suos inimicos. Ita laetitia, moeror, luctus,

(There) were likewise (some), who might know (did recognize) their-own enemies. Thus gladness, sorrow, grief,

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atque gaudia varie-agitabantur per omnem exercit.

and joys were variously-mixed (exhibited) throughout the whole army.

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END OF THE CATALINE CONSPIRACY


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