The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 14

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Sed postquam civitas corrupta-est luxu atque desidia, respublica sustentabat rursus vitia

But after the state was corrupted by luxury and by inactivity, the republic did support again the vices of (its)

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imperatorum atque magistratuum sua magnitudine ; ac sicuti parente effeta, sane haud quisquam

generals and magistrates from its-own greatness; and as-if the parent (having been) worn-out, indeed not any-one

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magnus virtute fuit Romae multis tempestatibus. Sed fuere mea memoria duo viri, Marcus Cato

great in virtue has been at Rome for many seasons (periods), But (there) were in my memory two men, Marcus Cato

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et Caius Caesar, ingenti virtute, diversis moribus, quos quoniam res obtulerat, fuit non

and Caius Caesar, with (of) great virtue, with different manners, whom since the thing (the subject) has presented, it has been not (my)

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consilium praeterire silentio, quin aperirem naturam et mores utriusque, quantum possem

design to pass-by in silence, but (that) I might disclose the nature and manners of each, as-much-as I might be-able to

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ingenio. Igitur genus, aetas, eloquentia fuere prope aequalia his; magnitudo animi par, item

by ability. Therefore extraction, age, eloquence were nearly equal to these; (their) greatness of mind equal, likewise (their)

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gloria, sed alia alii. Caesar habebatur magnus beneficiis ac munificentia,

glory, but other (different) to the other (to each). Caesar was had (accounted) great by kindnesses and munificence,

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Cato integritate vitae. Ille factus clarus mansuetudine et misericordia; severitas addiderat

Cato by integrity of life. He (the former) (was) made renowned by mildness and by compassion; severity had added

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dignitatem huic. Caeser adeptus-est gloriam

dignity to this (the latter). Caesar obtained glory by giving, by relieving, by pardoning; Cato by bestowing nothing.

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Perfugium miseris in altero pernicies malis in altero. Facilitas illius,

A refuge to the wretched (was) in the other (one), destruction to the bad in the other. The easiness (of access ) of that (the former),

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constantia hujus landabatur. Postremo, Caesar induxerat in animum laborare, vigilare,

the constancy or this (the latter) was praised, Finally, Caesar had induced into (his) mind (had resolved) to labor, to watch,

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intentus negotiis amicorum, negligere sua, denegare nihil, quod esset (imp. sub.) dignum dono;

intent to (on) the affairs of friends, to neglect his-own, to deny nothing, which might be (was) worthy a gift;

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exoptabat sibi magnum imperium, exercitum, novum bellum, ubi virtus posset enitescere. At

he did wish for himself great command, an army, a new war, where (his) valor might be-able to shine-forth. But

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studium modestiae, decoris, sed maxuma severitatis, erat Catoni. Certabat non cum divite divitiis, neque

a zeal of (for) moderation, of propriety, but chiefly of strictness, was to Cato. He did contend not with the rich in riches, neither

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cum factioso factione; sed cum strenuo virtute, cum modesto pudore, cum innocente abstinentia:

with the factions in faction; but with the strenuous in virtue, with the modest in modesty, with the innocent in abstinence. [and purity]

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malebat esse bonus quam videri; ita, quo minus petebat gloriam, eo magis

he had-rather to be good than to seem (so); thus, by what (how much) less he did seek glory, by that the more

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adsequebatur. Postquam, uti dixi, senatus discessit in sententiam Catonis: consul ratus

it did attend (him). After, as I have said, the senate departed into [adopted] the opinion of Cato: the consul having deemed

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optumum factu antecapere noctem, quae instabat, ne quid novaretur eo

(It) best to be done to anticipate the night, which did press-on lest any (thing) might be renewed (might be changed) in the

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spatio, jubet trium viros parare, quae supplicium postulabat; ipse, praesidiis dispositis,

space [or time], orders the triumviri (sheriffs) to prepare, what the punishment did require; he, the guards having been arranged,

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deducit Leutulum in carcerem ; idem fit caeteris per praetores. Est locus in carcere, quod

leads-down Lentulus into prison; the same is done to the rest by the praetors, There is a place in the prison, which

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appellatur Tullianum, depressus circiter duodecim pedes humi, ubi ascenderis paululum

called Tullianum, sunk about twelve feet of (in) the ground, where you shall have ascended a little

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ad laevam. Parietes atque camera insuper, vincta lapideis fornicibus, muniunt eum undique: sed

to the left. Walls and a vault from above, bound by stone arches, secure it on-every-side: but

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facies ejus est foeda atque terribilis incultu, tenebris, odore. Postquam Lentulus

the appearance of it is filthy and terrible from dirt [from neglect], darkness, [and] stench. After that Lentulus

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demissus in eum locum, vindices capitalium rerum, quibus praeceptum-erat, fregere

was sent-down into that place, the avenger of capital things (executioner), to whom it bad been commanded, broke (his)

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gulam laqueo. Ita ille patricius ex clarissimi gente Corneliorum, qui habuerat

throat with a rope [strangled him]. Thus that patrician of the most-renowned nation (family) of the Cornelii, who had had

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consulare imperium Romae, invenit exitum vitae dignum suis moribus que factis. Supplicium

the consular authority of (at) Rome, found an end of life worthy his manners and deeds. Punishment

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sumptum-est eodem modo de Cethego, Statilio Gabinio, Cepario.

was-taken in the same manner of (on) Cethegus, Statilius, Gabinius, Ceparlus.

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Dum ea geruntur Romae, Catilina instituit duas legiones ex omni copis, quam ipse

While those (things) are carried-on at Rome, Catiline formed two legions out-of all the force, which he

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adduxerat, et Manlius habuerat; complet cohortes pro numero militum;

had led [had brought with him], and Manlius had had; he fills-up the cohorts according-to [his] number of soldiers ]

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dein uti quisque voluntarius, aut ex sociis venerat in castra, distribuerat aequaliter; ac

afterwards as each volunteer, or [those] out-of the allies had come into the camp, he had distributed (them) equally; and

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expleverat legiones numero hominum brevi spatio; cum non-habuisset

he had filled-up the legions with the number of men in a short space (of time) when (whereas) he might not have had (he had not)

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initio amplius duobus millibus. Sed circiter quarta pars ex omni copia instructa-erat militaribus

in the beginning more (than) two thousand. But about a fourth part out-of all the force had been furnished with military

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armis; caeteri, ut casus armaverat quemque, portabant sparos aut lanceas, alii praeacutas sudes. Sed

arms; the rest, as chance had armed each, did carry javelins or lances, some sharp-pointed stakes. But

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postquam Antonius adventabat cum exercitu, Catilina facere iter per montes: modo

after-that Antony did approach with an army, Catiline (began) to make (his) march through (over) the mountains: now

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movere castra ad urbem, modo versus in Galliam; non dare occasionem pugnandi hostibus.

to move (his) camps to the city, now towards into Gaul; not to give [he did not give an] opportunity of fighting to the enemies

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Sperabat se habiturum propediem magnas copias, si socii patravissent incepta Romae.

He did hope himself about-to-have shortly great forces, if (his) companions might have executed (their) undertakings at Rome.

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Interea, fretus opibus conjurationis, repudiabat servitia, cujus magnae copiae concurrebant

Meantime, relying to (on) the resources of the conspiracy, he did reject slaves of which great forces (numbers) did run-together

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ad eum initio; simul videri alienum suis rationibus, communieaase causam civium

to him in the beginning; at-the-same-time (thinking it) to seem foreign to his purposes, to have shared the cause of citizens

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cum fugitivis servis. Sed postquam nuncius pervenit in castra, conjurationem patefactam

with fugitive slaves. But after-that a messenger arrived into the camps, [that] the conspiracy (to be) is laid-open [was discovered]

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Romae ; supplicium sumptum de Lentulo et Cethego, que caeteris, quos memoravi

at Rome; [that] punishment [was] taken of (on) Leotulus and Cethegus, and the others, whom I have mentioned

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supra; plerique, quos spes rapinarum, aut studium novarum rerum, illexerat, dilabuntur: Catilina

above; many, whom the hope of rapines, or zeal of new things (change), had allured, slip-away, Catiline

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abducit reliquos, magnis itineribus per asperos montis (montes), in Pistoriensem agrum, eo consilio,

leads-off the rest, by great marches through rugged mountains, into the Pistorian land, with this design,

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uti profugeret occulte per tramites in Galliam. At Quintus Metellus Celer existumans Catilinam, ex

that he might escape secretly by by-ways into Gaul. But Quintus Metellus Celer thinking Catiline, from

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difficultate rerum, agitare illa eadem, quae diximus supra, praesidebat cum

the difficulty of things (his circumstances), to agitate (project) those same (things), which we have said above, did preside with

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tribus legionibus in Piceno agro. Igitur, ubi cognovit iter ejus ex perfugis, movit

three legions in the Picene land, Therefore, when be knew [the direction or] the march or him from deserters, he moved

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castra propere, ac consedit sub radicibus ipsis montium, qull descensus erat illi

camps hastily, and encamped under the roots themselves (at the foot) or the mountains, where a descent was to him (Catiline

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properanti in Galliam. Neque tamen Antonius aberat longe, utpote qui sequeretur magno exercitu

hastening into Gaul. Neither however Antony was distant far, as (one) who might (did) follow with a great army

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expeditos in fugam aequloribus locis. Sed Catilina, postquam vidit sese

the disencumbered (those light armed) into flight (for retreat) in more-level places, But Catiline, after-that be saw himself

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clausum montibus atque copiis hostium, res adversas in urbe, neque ullam spem fugae, neque praesidii,

enclosed by mountains and the forces of the enemies, things adverse In the city, neither any hope of flight, nor of protection

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ratus optumum factu tentare fortunam belli in tali re,

[of succor], having deemed (it) the best [thing] to be done [he could do] to try the fortune of war in such a thing (crisis),

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statuit confligere Antonio quam-primum. Itaque concione advocata, habuit

resolved to engage to (with) Antony as-first (as soon as possible) Therefore an assembly having been called, he (delivered)

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orationem hujuscemodi: "Ego habeo compertum, milites! verba.

a speech of this-kind: "I have (it) found, soldiers I [that] words [do]

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non addere virtutem viris; neque exercitum fieri strenuum ex ignavo, neque fortem

not to add (give) valor to men; neither [is] an army to be made vigorous from (being) indolent, nor brave

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ex timido, oratione imperatoris. Quanta audacia inest animo cujusque, natura aut moribus,

from fearful, by the speech of a general. How-much courage is-in to the mind of every-one, by nature or by dispositions,

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tanta solet patere in bello. Nequicquam hortere, quem neque gloria neque pericula

so-much is-wont to lie-open (be displayed) in war. In-vain you may exhort (him), whom neither glory nor dangers

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excitant: timor animi officit auribus. Sed ego advoeavi vos, quo monerem pauca,

excite" cowardice of mind obstructs to (his) ears, But I have assembled you, so-order-that I might advise a few (things),

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simul, uti aperirem causam mei consilii Milites, scitis quantam cladem socordia atque

at-the-same-time, that I might disclose the cause of my design. Soldiers, you know how-great a defeat the slothfulness and

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ignavia Lentuli attulerit ipsi que nobis, que quo modo, dum opperior praesidia

indolence of Lentulus may have brought (has brought) to himself and to us, and in what manner, while I am-waiting-for reinforcements

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ex urbe, nequiverim (perf. sub.) proficisci in Galliam. Vero nunc omnes intelligitis juxta

out-of the city, I may have been-unable (I have been unable) to set-out into Gaul, But now (you) all understand equally

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mecum in quo loco nostrae res sint. Duo exercitus hostium, unus ab urbe, alter a Gallia.

with me in what situation our things may be (are), Two armies of enemies, one from the clty, the other from Gaul

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obstant: egestas frumenti atque aliarum rerum prohibet esse diutius in his locis, si animus

oppose (us): the want of corn and or other things prevents (us) to be longer in these places, if (our) mind

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maxume-ferat, Iter est aperiundum ferro, quocunque placet ire.

may chiefly-bear (incline). A way [Even if our minds incline us that way.] is to-be-opened by the sword, wheresoever it pleases (us) to go

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