The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 13

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Jampridem equidem amisimus vera vocabula. rerum; quia largiri aliena bona vocatur liberalitas ;

Long-since indeed we have lost the true titles of things; because to bestow another's goods is called liberality;

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audacia malarum rerum, fortitudo; eo respublica est sita in extremo. Quoniam

boldness or (in) bad things, fortitude; therefore the republic is situate in extreme (danger). Since

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mores habent se ita, sint sane liberales ex fortunis sociorum; sint misericordes

manners have themselves so, let (them) be indeed liberal out-of the fortunes or (our) allies let (them) be compassionate

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in furibus aerarii: ne illis largiantur nostrum sanguinem,

towards the thieves of the treasury: not to them may they bestow our blood, [let them only not bestow our blood on them]

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et dum parcunt paucis (dat.) sceleratis, eant perditum omnis (omnes) bonos. Caius Caesar

and while they spare a few wicked (men), they may go to destroy all the good. Caius Caesar

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disseruit paulo ante, in hoc ordine, bene et composita de vita et morte; credo, existumans

has discussed a little before, in this order (house), well and elegantly about life and death; I believe, thinking

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ea. falsa, quae memorantur de inferis, malos habere tetra, inculta, foeda, atque

those (things) false, which are related of the low (regions), [that] the bad to have (inhabit) noisome, waste filthy, [and]

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formidolosa loca, diverso itinere a bonis. Itaque censuit pecunias eorum

dreadful places, in a different way (direction) from the good. Therefore he has decided the moneys (property) or them

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publicandas, ipsos habendos in custodiis per municipia; videlicet, ne, si sint Romae,

to-be-confiscated, themselves to-be-kept in custody (prison) through the municipal-towns; indeed, lest, if they may be at Rome,

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eripiantur per vim, aut a popularibus conjurationis, aut a conducta multitudine. Quasi

they may be rescued through force, either by the accomplices of the conspiracy, or by a hired multitude. As-if

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vero mali atque scelesti sint (sub.) tantummodo in urbe, et non per totam Italiam; aut

indeed bad and wicked (men) may be (are) only in the city, and not through the whole Italy; or

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audacia non-possit plus ibi, ubi sunt minores opes ad-defendendum. Quare

boldness may not-be able (to do) more there, where (there) are less resources to-defend [means of defend]. Wherefore

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equidem hoc consilium est vanum, si metuit periculum ex illis. Sin solus timet non in tanto metu

indeed this advice is vain, if he fears danger from them. But-if (be) alone fears not in so-great fear

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omnium, refert me timere magis mihi, atque vobis. Quare cum statuetis de Publio

of all, it concerns me to hear the more for me, and Wherefore when you shall determine concerning Publius

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Lentulo que caeteris; habetote pro certo, vos simul decernere de exercitu Catilinae,

Lentulus and the others; have (it) for certain, [that] you at-the-time decree concerning the army of Catiline,

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et de omnibus conjuratis. Quanto attentius agetis ea, tanto

and concerning all the conspirators, By how-much the more-attentively (vigorously) you shall do those (things), by so-much

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animus erit infirmior illis: si viderint vos languere modo paululum, aderunt feroces.

mind (spirit) shall be weaker to them: If they shall have seen you to languish only a-little, they will be-present fierce. [The more vigorously you act, the more you will dispirit them; the more remissly you act, the more you will encourage them.]

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Nolite existumare nostros majores fecisse rem- publicam magnam ex parva armis. Si

Be-unwilling to think [that] our ancestors to have made the republic great from (being) small by arms [alone]. If

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res esset (imp. sub.) ita, nos haberemus eam multo pulcherrumam : quippe major copia

the thing might be (were) so, we might have it by-much the most-fair (splendid) : for a greater abundance

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sociorum atque civium, praeterea armorum atque equorum, est nobis quam illis. Sed alia

of allies and of citizens, moreover of arms and of horses, is to us than to them [our ancestors]. But other

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fuere, quae fecere illos magnos, quae sunt nulla nobis: industria domi;

(things) were, which made them great, which are none to us [which we have not]: industry of (at) home;

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justum imperium foris; animus liber in consulendo; neque obnoxius delicto, neque lubidini. Pro his

just government abroad ; a mind free in deliberating; neither subservient to crime, nor to passion. Instead-of these

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nos habemus luxuriam atque avaritiam: egestatem publice, opulentiam privatim: landamus divitias,

we have luxury and avarice: want publicly, opulence privately: we praise riches,

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sequimur inertia.m: nullum discrimen inter bonos et malos; ambitio possidet omnia praemia

we fol1ow sloth: (we make) no difference between the good and the bad; ambition possesses all the rewards

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virtutis. Neque mirum, ubi vos capitis consilium separatim, quisque sibi; ubi domi servitis

of virtue. Nor (is it) wonderful, when you take counsel separately, every one for himself; when at home you are slaves

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voluptatibus, hic pecuniae aut gratiae; ea fit, ut impetus fiat in vacuam

to pleasures, here to money or to interest; therefore it is made (happens), that an attack may be made against the empty (defenseless)

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rempublicam. Sed ego omitto haec. Nobilis-sumi cives conjuravere incendere patriam;

republic. But I omit these (things). Most-noble citizens have conspired to burn (their) country;

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arcessunt ad bellum gentem Gallorum, infestis-sumam Romano nomini; dux hostium est

they invite to war the nation of the Gauls, most-hostile to the Roman name: the leader of the enemies is

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supra caput cum exercitu: Vos etiam nunc cunctamini et dubitatis, quid faciatis

over head (is close at hand) with an army: (Do) you even now hesitate and doubt, what you may do

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hostibus deprehensis intra moenia? Censeo misereamini; adolescentuli homines deliquere per

to enemies apprehended within the walls? I suppose you may pity (them); the very-young men have errored through

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ambitionem: atque dimittatis etiam armatos! Nae ista mansuetudo et misericordia vertet in

ambition: and you may dismiss (them) even armed! Truly that mildness and mercy will turn into

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miseriam vobis, si illi ceperint arma. Soilicet, res ipsa est aspera, sed vos timetis non

ruin to you, if they shall have taken arms. Forsooth the thing itself is harsh [dangerous], but you fear not

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eam! Immo, vero maxume; sed expectantes, alius alium, cunctemini inertia et mollitia. animi,

It! Nay, Indeed very-much, but awaiting, one another, you hesitate from indolence and effeminacy of mind.

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videlicet confisi immortalibus diis, qui saepe servavere hanc rempublicam in maxumis periculis. Auxilia

Indeed trusting to the immortal gods, who often have preserved this republic in the greatest dangers. The help

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deorum parantur non votis, neque muliebribus suppliciis; omnia cedunt prospere vigiĀ­lando,

of the gods are procured not by vows, nor womanish supplications; all (things) yield (occur) prosperously by watching,

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agendo, consulendo bene. Implores deos nequicquam, ubi tradideris (perf. sub.)

by acting, by consulting, well. You may implore the gods in-vain, when you may have delivered

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to socordiae atque ignaviae: sunt irati que infesti. Apud nostros majores Aulus

you to heartlessness (slothfulness) and indolence: they are angry and hostile. Among our ancestors Aulus

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Manlius Torquatus jussit filium necari Gallico bello, quod is pugnaverat in hostem

Manlius Torquatus ordered (his) son to be put-to-death in the Gallio war, because he had fought against an enemy

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contra imperium: atque ille egregius adolescens dedit poenas morte immoderatae fortitudinis.

against order: and that excellent young-man gave (suffered) punishments by death of (for his) excessive bravery

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Vos-cunctamini, quid statuatis de crudelissumis parricidis? Videlicet caetera vita eorum obstat

Do you-hesitate, what you may resolve concerning the most-cruel parricides? Indeed the rest (former) life of them opposes (excuses)

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huic sceleri! Verum parcite dignitati Lentuli, si ipse pepercit unquam pudicitiae, si suae famae,

to this wickedness! But spare to the dignity of Lentulus, if he has spared ever to chastity, if to his-own character,

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si ullis diis aut hominibus. Ignoscite adolescentiae Cethegi, nisi fecit jam iterum bellum

If to any gods or to men. Pardon to the youth of Cethegus, unless he has made already again war (against his)

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patriae. Nam quid ego-loquar de Gabinio, Statilio, Caepario, quibus si quidquam pensi fuisset

country. For what shall-I-speak of Gabinius, Statilio, Caeparius, to whom if any of consideration might have been

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(plup. sub.) unquam, habuissent non ea consilia de republica ?

(had been) ever, they might have held not (had not held) those counsels concerning the republic? [Who if they ever had any reflection, would not have entertained those designs against the republic.]

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Postremo, conscripti patres, si locus esset peccato, mehercule, facile-paterer vos corrigi

Lastly, conscript fathers, if place might be (if there were room) for error, [by Hercules,] I would easily suffer you to be corrected

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re ipsa, quoniam contemnitis verba. Sed sumus circumventi undique: Catilina urget

by the thing itself, since you despise words. But we are beset on-every-side: Catiline presses to (our)

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faucibus cum exercitu: alii hostes sunt intra moenis, atque in sinu urbis. Neque potest

jaws (closely) with an army: other enemies are within the walls, and in the bosom of the city. Neither can

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quidquam parari neque consuli occulte: quo est properandum magis.

any (thing) be prepared nor be consulted secretly: therefore it is to-be-hastened the more. [Therefore speedy action is required.]

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Quare ego ita censeo. Cum respublica venerit (per. sub.) in maxuma pericula nefario consilio

Therefore I thus determine. Since the republic may have come (has come) into the greatest dangers by the horrible counsels

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sceleratorum civium; que hi convicti-sint (perf. sub.) indicio Titi Vulturcii, et legatorum Allobrogum,

of wicked citizens; and these may have been convicted by the information of Titus Vuturcius, and of the ambassadors of the Allobroges,

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que confessi-(sint) (perf. sub.) paravisse caedem, incendia, que alia foeda atque crudelia

and may have confessed to have prepared murder, burnings, and other abominable and cruel

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facinora in civis (cives) que patriam; supplicium sumendum, more majorum, de

crimes against (their) citizens and country; (that) punishment be-taken, by the custom of (our) ancestors, of (on those)

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confessis, sicuti de manifestis capitalium rerum."

having confessed, as of (those) manifest (clearly convicted) of capital things (crimes)."

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Postquam Cato assedit, omnes consulares, que item magna pars senatas, landant sententiam

Alter Cato sat-down, all the consular (men), and also a great part of the senate, praise the opinion

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ejus; ferunt virtutem animi ad coelum: alii increpantes vocant alios timidos: Cato habetur

of him; bear (extol) the virtue of (his) mind to heaven: others chiding call others fearful: Cato is had

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clarus atque magnus: decretum senati fit, sicut ille censuerat. Sed forte lubuit

(accounted) renowned and great: a decree of the senate is made, as he had determined. But by chance it has pleased

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mihi, legenti multa, andienti multa praeclars facinora, quae Romanus populus fecit domi que militiae,

to me, reading many, hearing many illustrious exploits, which the Roman people has done at-home and at war

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mari atque terra, attendere, quae res sustinuisset maxume tanta negotia. Sciebam

(abroad), by sea and by land, to consider, what thing might have sustained chiefly so-great affair. I did know (them)

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saepenumero contendisse parva manu cum magnis legionibus hostium: cognoveram bella gesta

oftentimes to have contended with a small band with great legions of enemies: I have known wars carried-on [by them]

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parvis copiis cum opulentis regibus: ad hoc saepe toleravisse

with small forces with opulent (powerful) kings: add to this [that they] often to have borne [have sustained]

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violentiam fortunae: Graecos fuisse ante Romanos facundia, Gallos gloria belli. Ac

the violence of fortune: [that] the Greeks to have been [were] before the Romans in eloquence, the Gauls in the glory of war. And

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constabat mihi, agitanti multa egregiam virtutem paucorum civium patravisse cuncta;

it was evident to me, discussing many (things), [that] the singular virtue of a few citizen to have performed [performed] all (things);

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que factum eo, uti paupertas superaret (imp. sub.) divitias, paucitas multitudinem.

and (it was) done (came to pass) by that, that poverty might overcome (overcame) riches, fewness multitude.

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