The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 5

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omnes caeteri strenui, boni, nobiles atque ignobiles fuimus vulgus, sine gratia, sine auctoritate,

all the rest strenuous, good, noble and ignoble have been a rabble, without favor (interest), without authority,

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obnoxii his quibus, si respublica valeret, essemus formidini. Itaque omnis gratia,

subservient to those to whom, if the republic might prevail, (prevailed) we should be for a terror. Therefore all interest,

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potentia, honos, divitiae sunt apud illos, aut ubi volunt: reliquerunt nobis pericula, repulsas, judicia,

power, honor, riches are at (with) them, or where they will: they have left to us dangers, repulses, trials,

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egestatem. Quae quousque-tandem, fortissimi viri petiemini? Nonne-paestat emori per

want. Which (things) how long, bravest men, will you endure? Is it not better to die by

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virtutem, quam amittere miseram atque inhonestam vitam per dedecus, ubi fueris

valor, then to lose a wretched and dishonorable life by disgrace, when you may have been

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ludibrio alienae superbiae? Verum enimvero, pro fidem deum atque hominum, victoria

the laughing-stock to strange (another's) pride? But truly, Before the faith of gods and of men, victory

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est nobis in manu; aetas viget, animus valet: contra omnia consenuerunt

is to us in hand, [in our possession] (our) age flourishes, (our) mind prevails: on the other hand all (things) have grown old

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illis annis atque divitiis. Est opus tantummodo incepto, res expediet caetera.

to them in years and riches. (There) is need only for a beginning, thing (the matter itself) will prepare the rest

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Etenim quis mortalium, cui est virile ingenium, potest tolerare divitias superare illis,

For who of mortals, to whom (there) is a manly disposition, can endure riches to abound to them, [them to abound in riches]

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quas profundunt in exstruendo mari, et montibus coaequandis,

which they squander in building

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familiarem rem deesse nobie etiam ad necessaria.

private thing (property) to be wanting to us even to (for) necessary. (matters) [While we want the necessaries of life].

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Illos continnare binas domos aut amplius: ullum familiarem larem

Those who can endure to extend two (united) houses or more [in one]: any private household god (abode)

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nusquam nobis ? Cum emunt tabulas, signa, toreumata diruunt

no where to us? [While we have no where a home of our own]. When they buy pictures, statues, chased-vessels, pull-down (plate)

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nova, aedificant alia: postremo, trahunt, vexant pecuniam omnibus modis; tamen

new (buildings), build others: finally, they draw (consume) torture money [squander money] in all manners; yet

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nequeunt vincere suas divitias summa lubidine. At inopia est nobis domi, alienum-aes

are unable to exceed their riches by the utmost extravagance. (of expenditure) But want is to us at home, debt

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foris, res mala, spes multo asperior. Denique, quid reliqui habemus

abroad, thing (our situation) bad, hope by much rougher(worse) Finally, what of remaining have we (what have we left)

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praeter miseram animam? Quin igitur expergiscimini? En! illa, illa libertas, quam

except a wretched life? But therefore do you awake? so! that, that liberty, which

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optastis saepe; paeterea divitiae, decus, gloria, sita-sunt in oculis: fortuna posuit omnia ea

you have wished for often; besides riches, honor, glory are placed in eyes (view): fortune has placed all those (as)

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praemia victoribus. Res, tempus, pericula, egestas, magnifica spolia belli hortentur

rewards to the conquerors. The thing (circumstance), time, dangers, want, the magnificent spoils of war may exhort

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vos magis quam mea oratio. Utemini me vel imperatore vel milite: neque animus neque

you more than my speech. You shall use me either (as) general or (fellow) soldier: neither (my) mind nor

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corpus aberit a vobis. Consul agam, ut spero, haec ipsa una, vobiscum: nisi forte

body shall be absent from you. (As) consul I shall do, as I hope, those very (things) together with you: unless by chance

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animus fallit me, et vos parati-estis servire magis quam imperare.

my) mind deceive me, and you have been prepared (disposed) to serve rather than to command.

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Postquam homines eccepere ea, quibus omnia mala erant abunde, sed neque res

After the men received (heard) those (things) to whom all evils were abundantly, but neither thing

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neque ulla bona spes: tametsi videbatur illis magna merces movere quieta; tamen

(property) nor any good hope: although it did seem to them a great reward to move quiet (things); notwithstanding

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plerique postulare uti proponeret, quae foret conditio belli: quae praemia peterent

many (began) to require that he would propose, what would be the condition of war: what rewards they might seek

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armis: quid que ubi opis aut spei haberent. Tum Catilina polliceri novas tabulas

by arms: what and where of resource or hope they might have. Then Catiline (began) to promise new tablets (a remission of debts)

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proscriptionem locupletium, magistratus, sacerdotia, rapines, omnia alia quae bellum

a proscription of the wealthy, magistrates, priesthoods, rapines, all other(things) which war

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atque lubido victorum fert: praeterea, Pisonem esse in citeriore Hispania, Publium

and [the] lust of conquerors bears (brings): moreover, [that] Piso to be (was) in hither Spain, Publius

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Sittium Nucerinum cum exercitu in Mauritania, participes sui consilii: Caium Antonium

Sittius Nucerinus with an army in Mauritania, partakers of his design: [that] Caius Antony

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petere consulatum, quem speraret fore collegium sibi, hominem et

to seek [sought] the consulship, whom he would hope (he hoped) to be about to be [would be a] colleague to himself, a man and

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familiarem et circumventum omnibus necessitudinibus:

(both) familiar and beset by all obligations: [his familiar acquaintance, and under many obligations to him]

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se consulem facturum initium agendi cum eo. Ad-hoc increpabat

himself (Catiline) consul about to make (would make) a beginning of acting with him. Besides he did revile

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maledictis omnea bonos: nominans unumquemque suorum, landare, admonere

[with imprecations] all good (men): naming each of his own, (he began) to praise (him), to remind

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alium egestatis, alium sue cupiditatis, complures periculi aut ignominiae, multos Sullana

one of (his) poverty, another of his desire many of danger or disgrace, many of the Syllanian

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victoriae, quibus ea fuerat praedae. Postquam videt animos omnium alacris; (alacres) cohortatus,

of victory, to whom that had been for booty. After he sees the minds of all cheerful; having exhorted

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ut haberent suam petitionem curae,

(them ), that they would have his petition (canvass) for a concern, [that they would exert themselves in his canvass for the consulship]

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dimisit conventum. Fuere ea tempestate, qui dicerent Catilinam, oratione

he dismissed the assembly. There had been at that time, (those) who might say (said) [that] Catiline, the speech

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habita, circumtulisse in pateris sanguinem humani corporis, permixtum vine cum

having been delivered, to have carried about in goblets [carried about] the blood of a human body, [mingled with wine] when

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adigeret populares sui sceleris ad jusjurandum; inde cum omnes degustavissent

he would force the accomplices of his wickedness to an oath; then when all might have tasted (had tasted)

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post exsecrationem, sicuti consuevit fieri in solemnibus sacris, aperuisse suum consilium;

after the execration (oath), as has been wont to be done in solemn sacred rites, to have disclosed [his] design;

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atque dictitare fecisse eo, quo forent magis

and to say frequently [that they frequently said] to have done (that he did it) for this purpose, in order that they might be more

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fidi inter se, conscii alius alii tanti facinoris. Nonnulli existumabant et haec,

faithful among themselves, (being) conscious one to another of so great a crime. Some did think and (both) these (things),

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et multa praeterea ficte ab iis, qui credebant invidiam Ciceronis. quae postea

and many besides feigned by those, who did believe the envy (hatred) of (against) Cicero, which afterwards

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orta-est, leniri atrocitate sceleris eorum, qui dederant poenas. Ea res

arose, to be assuaged by the heinousness of the wickedness of those, who had given (suffered) punishments. That thing has

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comperta-est nobis parum pro magnitudine.

been found out [to us] little (insufficiently) for (in proportion to its) greatness. [The proof seems not to us sufficient to decide in so weighty an accusation]

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Sed Quintus Curius fuit in ea;

But Quintus Curius was in that conspiracy, born not in obscure place, (honorably descended)

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coopertus flagitiis aqtque facinoribus; quem censores amoverant senatu gratia probri.

overwhelmed with villanies and crimes; whom the censors had expelled from the senate on account of disgrace.

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Non minor vanitas quam audacia inerat huic homini: neque reticere

No less vanity [and indiscretion] than boldness was in [appertained] to this man: [nor] to keep secret [could he keep secret]

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quae ipse andierat, neque occultare suamet scelera.; prorsus

what (things) he had heard, nor to conceal [nor could he conceal] his own crimes; nor in short

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habebat quiequam pensi neque dicere neque facere. Vetus consuetudo stupri erat ei cum Fulvia,

he cared not what he said or did. An old habit of intrigue was to him with Fulvia,

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nobili muliere, cui cum esset minus gratus, quod minus-poterat

a noble woman, to whom when he might be (he was) less agreeable, because he was less able

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largiri inopia, repente glorians, polliceri maria que montes, interdum

to bestow from poverty, suddenly boasting, (he began) to promise seas and mountains, (to make great promises), sometimes

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minari ferro ni foret obnoxia sibi: postremo, agitare ferocius quam solitus-erat.

to threaten with iron (the sword), unless she would be compliant To him: In fine, to set more rudely than be had been wont.

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At Fulvia, causa insolentiae Curii cognita, habuit non occultum tale periculum reipublicae: sed

But Fulvia, the cause of the rudeness of Curius having been known, not secret such danger to the republic, but kept

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auctore sublato, narravit compluribus quae, quo modo, andierat de conjuratione

the author having been suppressed, related to many what, (and) in what manner, she had heard of the conspiracy

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Catilinae. Ea res imprimis accendit studia. hominum ad consulatum manda.ndum Marco Tullio

of Catiline. That thing chiefly kindled the zeals (zeal) of men to the consulship to be committed to Marcus Tullius

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Ciceroni. Namque antea pleraque nobilitas aestuabat invidia, et credebat

Cicero. [To elect Cicero to the consulship]. For before most of the nobility did boil with envy, and did believe

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consulatnm quasi pollui, si novus homo adeptus-foret eum. Sed ubi periculum

the consulship as it to be defiled, it a new man (a person not noble] should have obtained it. But when danger

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advenit, invidia atque superbia post-fuere. Igitur comitiis habitis, Marcus

approached, envy and pride were postponed (of secondary consideration). Therefore elections having been held, Marcus

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Tullius et Caius Antonius declarantur consules. Quod factum primo concusserat populares

Tullius and Caius Antony are declared consuls, Which deed first had shaken the accomplices

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conjurationis. Tamen furor Catilinae neque minuebatur; sed agitare plura in-dies ;

of the conspiracy. However the rage of Catiline neither was diminished; but (he began) to agitate more (things every day;

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parare arma opportunis locis per Italiam; portare mutuam pecuniam sumptam sua aut

to prepare arms in convenient places through Italy; to convey borrowed money taken on his own or

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fide amicorum, Faesulas, ad quemdam Manlium; qui postea fuit princeps belli faciundi.

the credit of friends, to Faesulae, to a certain Manlium; who afterwards was chief of the war to be made (of making war).

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