The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 3

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quod vitium tamen erat propius virtutem. Nam bonus ignavus aeque exoptant sibi

which vice [or ambition] however was nearer to virtue. For the good (and) the indolent equally wish for themselves

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gloriam, honorem, imperium, sed ille nititur vera via;

glory, honour (preferment) authority, but he [the ambitious man] (the former) endeavors (for them) in the true way [by

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quia bonae artes desunt huic, contendit dolis atque

honorable means]; because good arts (qualities) are wanting to this the latter), [avarice], he strives (for them) by deceits and

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fallaciis. Avaritia habet studium pecuniae, quam nemo sapiens concupivit. Ea, quasi imbuta malis

fallacies. Avarice has a zeal [and desire] of money, which no wise (man) has coveted. It, as if imbued with bad

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venenis, effoeminat corpus que virilem animum: est semper infinita, insatiabilis: neque minuitur

poisons, enervates the body and manly mind: it always unbounded, insatiable: neither is [it] lessened

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copia neque inopia. Sed postquam Lucius Sulla, republica recepta; armis, habuit malos

by plenty or by want. But after Lucius Sylla, the republic having been recovered by arms, had bad

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eventus ex bonis initiis; omnes rapere trahere: alius cupere domum, aliue

results from good beginnings; all (began) to plunder to draw (to take away): another (one) to covet a house, another

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agros. Victores habere neque modum neque modestiam: facere foeda que

lands. [That] the conquerors to have [had] neither manner (bounds) nor modesty (moderation): to do [and did] disgraceful and

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crudelia facinora in civis. Huc

cruel crimes against (their) fellow citizens. Hither did come (to this was to be added), that Lucius Sylla, contrary to

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morem majorum, habuerat exercitum, quem ductaveret in Asia, luxuriose que nimis

the custom of (our) ancestors, had (treated) the army, which he had often led in Asia, intemperately and too

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liberaliter, quo faceret fidum sibi. Amoena, voluptaria loca facile molliverant ferocis

liberally, in order that he might make (it) faithful to himself Pleasant, voluptuous places easily had enervated the fierce

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(feroces) animos militum in otio. Ibi primum exercitus Romani populi insuevit amare,

minds of the soldiers in peace. There first the army of the Roman people became accustomed to love,

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potare, mirari signa, pictas tabulas, coelata vase; rapere ea privatim et publice,

to drink, to admire signs, (statues), painted tablets (pictures), carved vases; to plunder those (things) privately and publicly

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spoliare delubra, polluere omnia sacra que profana. Igitur hi milites, postquam adepti-sunt

to rob shrines (temples), to pollute all (things) sacred and profane. Therefore these soldiers, after they obtained

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victoriam, fecere nihil reliqui victis. Quippe secundae res fatigant

a victory, made nothing of remaining (left nothing, to the vanquished. For [indeed] prosperous things fatigue (try)

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animos sapientium; ne illi temperarent victoriae, moribus corruptis. Postquam

the minds of the wise; much less could they moderately enjoy victory, (their) manners having been corrupted. After

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divitiae caepere esse honori, et gloria, imperium, potentia sequebatur eas: virtus coepit

riches began to be for honor (an honor), and glory, authority, power did follow them: virtue began

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hebescere, paupertas haberi probro, innocentia duci pro malevolentia Igitur ex

to languish, poverty to be had (accounted) for a disgrace, innocence to be deemed for ill-will. Therefore out of

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divitiis, luxnria, atque avaritia, cum superbib, invasere juventutem. Rapere, consumere,

riches, luxury, and avarice, with pride invaded the youth. (They began) to plunder, to consume,

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pendere sus parvi, cupere aliena; habere pudorem, pudicitiam, divina atque humana

to esteem their own (things) of little(value), to desire others; to have modesty, chastity, divine and human

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promiscua, nihil pensi, neque moderati.

(things) promiscuous (undistinguished), nothing of regard, nor of moderation. [They disregarded these, and acted without

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Est pretium operae quum cognoveris domos atque villas

restraint]. It is a reward of labor (it is worth while), when you shall have known (have viewed) houses and villas

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exaedificatas in modum urbium, visere templa deorum, quae nostri majores, religiosissimi mortales,

built up in the manner of cities, to visit the temples of the gods, which our ancestors, most-devout mortals.

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fecere. Veram illi decorabant delubra deorum pietete, suas domos gloria; neque eripiebant

made. But they did adorn the temples of the gods with piety, their own houses with glory; nor did they snatch

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Quidquam victis paeter licentiam injuriae. At hi, contra ignavissimi homines,

any (thing) from the vanquished, except the privilege of (doing) injury. But these, on the other hand, most-indolent men,

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adimere, per summum scelus, onnia ea sociis quae fortissimi viri victores

(began) to take away, through the utmost wickedness, all those (things) from allies which the bravest men (who) conquerors

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reliquerunt hostibus, proinde-quasi facere injuriam, id esset demum uti imperio.

left to (their) enemies, just as if to do an injury, that might be at length (truly) to use authority.

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Nam quid memorem ea, quae aunt credibilia nemini, nisi his, qui videre; montes

For why may I relate those (things), which are credible to no one, unless to those, who have seen (them); [that] mountains

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esse subversos, maria constrata a compluribus privatis? Quibus divitiae videntur

[have to be overturned, seas covered over (built upon) by many private (persons)? To whom riches appear

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mihi fuisse ludibrio: quippe properabant abuti per turpitudinem, quas licebat habere

to me to have been for mockery: for they did hasten to abuse through baseness (the riches), which it was lawful to have

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honeste. Sed non minor lubido stupri, ganeae, que caeteri cultus, incesserat. Viri

honorably. But no less a lust of impurity, debauchery, and [of] other such habit, had invaded (them). Men (began)

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pati muliebria: mulieres habere pudicitiam in propatulo: exquirere omnia

to suffer (admit) womanish (practices): women to have chastity in common: to search out all (things)

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terra quo mari, causa vescendi, dormire priusquam cupido somni esset: non opperiri famem

by land and by sea, for the sake of feeding, to sleep before that inclination of sleep might be (to them): not to wait for hunger

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aut sitim, neque frigus neque lassitudinem; sed antocapere omnia ea luxu. Haec incendebant

or thirst, neither cold nor lassitude; but to anticipate all those by luxury. These (things) did inflame

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juventutem ad facinora, ubi familiares opes defecorant. Animus imbutus malis artibus,

the youth to crimes, when family (private) resources had failed (them). The mind imbued with bad arts (practices),

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hand facile carebat lubidinibus: eo erat profusius deditus quaestui atque sumptui

not easily did refrain from lusts: on this account it was the more lavishly addicted to acquisition and expenditure

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omnibus modis. In tanta que tam corrapta civitate, Catilina

in all manners. It so great and so corrupted a state. Catiline

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habebat, (id quod erat facillimum factu), catervas omnium flagitiosorum atque facinorosorum

did have, (that which was very easy to be done), troops of all wicked and desperate (fellows)

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circum se, tanquam stipatorum. Nam quicumque impudicus. adulter, ganeo laceraverat

around himself, as if body guards. For whatsoever unchaste (person), adulterer, debauchee had squandered (his)

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patria bona menu, ventre, pene; quique conflaverat grande alienum aes,

paternal goods by hand, belly (luxury), lust; whosoever had swelled up (contracted) a great other's brass (debt),

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quo redimeret flagitium aut facinus; paeterea omnes undique parricidae,

by which he might redeem (purchase pardon for) wickedness or crime; besides all [from everywhere the] parricides,

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sacrilegi convicti judiciis aut timentes juidicium pro factis; ad-hoc quos

sacrilegious (wretches) convicted in trials or fearing trial for (their) deeds; to this (moreover) (those) whom

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manus atque lingua alebat perjurio at civili sanguine; postremo, omnes quos flagitium, egestas,

their) hand and tongue did support by perjury and civil blood lastly, all whom villainy, want,

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conscius animus, exagitabat, hi erant proxumi que familiares Catilinae. Quod si quis etiam vacuus

a guilty mind, did harass, these were the nearest and familiar to Catiline. But if anyone even (yet) free

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a culpa, inciderat in amicitiem ejus, efficiebatur facile par que similis caeteris quotidiano usu atque

from fault, had fallen into the friendship of him, he was made

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illecebris. Sed appetebat maxum familiaritates adolescentium: animi eorum molles et fluxi aetate,

allurements. But he sought after chiefy the intimacies of young men: the minds of these soft and frail by age,

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hand difficulter capiebantur dolis. Nam uti studium cujusque flagrabat ex aetate

not difficultly were taken (ensnared) by wiles. For as

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praebere scorta, aliis, mercari canes atque equos allis: postremo, parcere neque sumptui

to afford harlots to others (some), to buy hounds and horses for others: finally, to spare neither expense

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neque suae modestiae, dum faceret obnoxios que fidos sibi. Scio nonnullos fuisse,

aor his own modesty (character), provided he could make (them) subservient and faithful to himself. I know some to have been,

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qui ita existumarent, juventutem, quae frequentabat domum Catilinae, habuisse pudicitiam

who thus would think (thought), the youth, which frequent the house of Catiline, to have had modesty

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param honeste: sed haec fama valebat magis ex allis rebus, quam quod id foret compertum

little (not) honorably: but this report did prevail more from other things, than that it might be (it was) found out

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cuiquam. Jamprimum Catilina, adolescens, fecerat multa nefanda stupra cum nobili

(known) to anyone. First of all Catiline, a young man, had done (committed) many abominable impurities with a noble

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virgine, cum sacerdote Vestae, et alia hujuscemodi, contra jus que fas: postrema,

virgin, with a priestess of Vesta, and other (things) of this kind, against human law and divine law: lastly,

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captus amore Aureliae Orestillae, cujus bonus unquam landavit nihil praeter formam; quod

taken with love of Aurelis Orestilla, of whom a good man ever praised nothing except (her) beauty; because

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ea, timens privignum adulta aetate, dubitabat nubere illi, creditur pro certo fecisse vacuam

she, fearing a stepson (of) mature age, did hesitate to marry to him, he is believed for certain to have made an empty

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domum, necato filio, scelestis nuptiis. quae res quidem videtur mihi in primis fuisse causa

house, [his son being killed], for the wicked nuptials. Which thing indeed seems [to me] chiefly to have been the cause of the enterprise to be hastened (hastening the conspiracy ). For

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impurus animus, infestus diis que hominibus, poterat sedari neque vigiliis neque quietibus:

[his] impure mind, hostile to gods and to men, was able to be allayed neither by watchings nor by rests (rest):

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concientia ita vexabat excitam mentem. Igitur color ei, exsanguis, oculi foedi, incessus

his conscience did harass (his) disturbed mind. Therefore complexion (was) to him pale, eyes foul, (his) gait

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modo citus, mode tardus: vecordia inerat prorsus in facia que vultu.

now quick, nor slow: madness was in throughout in (his) appearance end countenance. [His features indicated fury and malignity].

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Sed edocebat juventutem mala facinora, quam, ut diximus supra, illexerat: ex

But he did teach the youth wicked crimes, which, as we have said above, be had allured: out of

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illis commodare falsos testes que signatores; habere fidem,

them (he began) to accommodate (to furnish) false witnesses and signers (forgers); [and to instruct them] to have (bold) faith,

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fortunas, pericula vilia. Post, ubi attriverat famam atque pudorem eorum,

fortunes, dangers (as) insignificant. Afterwards, when he had worn away (ruined) the character and shame of them,

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imperabat alia majora. Si caussa peccandi minnuss-suppetebat in praesens, nihilominus

he did enjoin other greater (crimes). If an opportunity of sinning did not offer for the present, nevertheless (he ordered

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circumvenire, jugulare insontes sicuti sontes. Scilicet, ne menus aut animus torpesceret per

them) to beset, and to murder the innocent as if guilty. Forsooth, lest the hand or mind might become sluggish through

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otiam;erat malus atque crudelis potius gratuito. Catilina confisus his amicis

disuse; hears bad and cruel rather gratuitously (without a purpose ) Catiline having relied to (on) these friends

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que sociis, simul quod alienum aes erat ingens per omnis (omnes) terras;

and companions, at the same time because others' brass (debt), was great through all lands (throughout the whole country);

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