The Catiline Conspiracy - Chapter 2

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Poet ubi propulerant pericula, virtute portabant auxilia sociis atque amicis; que parabant

Afterward when they had repulsed dangers by virtue (valor) they did carry aids to allies and friends; and did prepare

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amicitias magis beneficiis dandis quam accipiundis.

(procure) friendships rather by favors to be given than to be received. [Rather by giving, than by receiving favors.]

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Habebant legitimum imperium, regium nomen imperii: delecti quibus corpus erat infirmum

They did have a legitimate government, a royal name of government: chosen (men) to whom the body was weak

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annis, ingenium validum sapientia, consultabant reipublicae. Hi, vel

by years, (their) understanding strong with wisdom did consult (legislate) for the republic. These, either from (their)

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aetate vel similitudine curae, appellabantur Patres. Post ubi regium imperium, quod

as or from the similitude of (their) care, were called fathers. Afterward when the royal government, which

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initio fuerat libertatis conservandae, atque reipublicae augendae, convertit

in the beginning had been (established) (for the sake) of liberty to be preserved, and of the republic to be increased, turned

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in superbiam que dominationem, more immutato, fecere sibi annus

(itself) into pride and tyranny, (their) practice having been changed, they made for themselves annual

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imperia, binos imperatores: eo mode putabant humanum animum posse minime insolescere per

governments, two rulers: by that means they did think the human mind to be able least to grow insolent through excess

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licentiam. Sed ea tempestate coepere quisque extollere se magis que magis, que habere

of power. But at that time they began each to extol (exert) himself more and more, and to have (his)

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ingenium in promptu: nam boni sunt suspectiores regibus quam mali; que

understanding in readiness: for good [and talented] (men) are more suspected to kings than bad [and stupid]; and

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aliena virtue est semper formidolosa his. Sed est incredibile memoratu, quantum civitas

strange (another's) virtue is always formidable to these. But it is incredible to be recorded, how much the state

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creverit brevi, libertate adepta: tanta cupido gloriae incesserat.

may have increased (increased) in a short time, liberty having been obtained: to greet a desire of glory had come in.

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Jamprimum juventus, simul-ac erat patiens belli, discebat in castris militiam

Now first the youth, as soon as it was (they were) able to endure war, did learn in the camps war

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usu per laborem; que habebat lubidinem magis in decoris armis, et militaribus equis, quam

from habit through exercise; and did have pleasure rather in beanttful arms, and military horses, than

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in scortis atque conviviis. Igitur labos erat non insolitus talibus viris, non-ullus locus asper aut

in harlots and banquets. Therefore labor was not unusual to such men, not any place rough or

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arduus; armatne hostis non formidolosus: virtus domuerat omnia. Sed maxumum certamen

difficult (inaccessible); an armed enemy [was] not formidable: virtue had subdued all (things). But a very great contest

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gloriae erat inter ipsos: quisquerat properabat ferire hostem, ascendere murum, conspici dum faceret

glory among them: each did hasten to strike the enemy, to scale the wall, to be beheld while he might do

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tale fatcinus: putabant eas divitias, eam bonam famam, que magnam nobilitatem.

(did perform) such enterprise: they did think these riches, that good fame, and great nobility (distinction).

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Erant avidi landis, liberales pecuniae; volebant ingentem gloriam, honestas divitias. Possem

They were desirous of praise, liberal of money; they did will (wished for) great glory, honorable riches. I could

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memorare in Quibus locis Romanus populus fuderit maxumas copiae hostium parva

to relate in what places the Roman people may have routed very great forces of the enemies with a small

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manu; quas urbes munitas natura ceperit pugnando, ni ea res

band; what cities fortified by nature (they) [the Roman people] may have taken (they took) in-fighting, unless that thing

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traheret nos longius ab incepto. Sed profecto fortuna dominatur in omni re; ea celebrat

would draw us farther (too far) from (our) undertaking. But indeed fortune controls every thing; she celebrates

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que obscurat cunctas res magis ex lubidine ex vero. Res gestae

eclipses (depresses) all things rather from caprice from truth (merit). The things carried on (deeds)

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Atheniensium, sicut ego existumo fuere satis amplae que magnificae; verum tamen aliquanto

of the Athenians, as I think, had been suffeciently ample (great) and magnificent; but however by somewhat

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minores quam feruntur fama: sed quia magna ingenia scriptorum provenere ibi,

less than they are borne (represented) by fame: but because great understandings (abilities) of writers sprang up there,

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facta Atheniensium celebrantur per terrarum orbem pro maxumis. Its virtus eorum, qui

the deeds of the Athenians are celebrated through the whole world for the greatest. So the virtue of those, who

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fecere ea, habetur tanta, quantum praeclara ingenia potuere

have done those (things), is accounted so great, as the brilliant understandings (of their writers) have been able to

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extollere ea, verbis. At ea copia nunquam fuit Romano populo: quia quisque

extol them [by their writings]. But that abundance (of writers) never has been to the Roman people: because each

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prudentissimus erat maxume negotiosus: nemo exercebat ingenium sine corpore: quisque

most-skillful (man) was most active: no one did exercise the understanding without the body: each

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optumus malebat facere quam dicere; sue benefacta landari ab allis, quam ipse narrare

(man) did rather wish to do than to say [and to have]; his own good deeds to be praised by others, than he to relate

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aliorum. Igitur boni mores colebantur domi, que militiae

(those) to others. Therefore good manners (practices) were celebrated [cultivated] at home, and at war (in the camp)

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concordia erst maxuma, avaritia minuma, jus que bonum valebat apud eos non magis legibus

anonymity was very great, (their) selfishness very small, justice and good did prevail among them not more by laws

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quam natura. Exercebant jurgia, discordias, simultates cum hostibus; cives certabant

than by nature. They did exercise (practice) contentions, discords, feuds with the enemies; citizens did vie

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civibus de virtute. Erant magnifici in suppliciis deorum, parci

with citizens concerning virtue [in deeds of valor]. They were magnificent in (their) worships (worship) of the gods, frugal

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domi, fideles in amicos. Curabant que se que rempublicam his duabus artibus,

of (at) home, faithful toward (their) friends. They did manage both themselves and the republic by these two arts

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audacia in bello, aequitate, ubi pax avenerat. Quarum rerum ego habeo haec maxuma

(practices), by boldness in by equity, when peace had happened. Of which things I have these very great

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documenta, quid in bello vindicatum est saepias in eos, qui pugnaverant in hostem

proofs, that in war it was vindicated (punishment was visited) oftener on those, who had fought against the enemy

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contra imperium, que qui revocati, excesserant tardius praelio, quam

contrary to command, and who having been recalled, had departed more slowly (too slowly) from battle, than (on those)

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qui pusi-erant relinquere signa, aut pulsi cedere loco: vero agitabant

who had dared to leave behind (their) standards, or having been repulsed to retire from place (their post): but they did conduct

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imperium in pace, magis beneficiis quam metu, injuria accepta, malebant ignoscere

the government in peace, rather by kindnesses than by fear, an injury having been received, they did rather wish to pardon

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quam persequi. Sed ubi respublica crevit labore atque justitia magni reges domiti bello;

than to avenge. But when the republic increased by industry in justice, [when] great kings (were) conquered in war;

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ferae nationes, et ingentes populi subacti vi Carthego, aemula Romani imperii,

savage nations, and great peoples (people) subdued by force, [when] Carthage, the rival of the Roman empire,

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interiit sb stirpe, cuncta maria que terrae patebant, fortuna caepit saevire

perished from (it's) stem, (was wholly destroyed), [then] all seas and lands did lie open, fortune began to rage

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ac miscere omnia. Otium, divitiae, optandae allis, fuere oneri que

and confound all (things). Peace, [repose] riches, (things) to be wished to others, [for by some] were for a burden and

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miserie iis, qui facile toleraverant dubias atque asperas res. Igitur prima cupido pecuniae,

wretchedness to those, who easily had endured doubtful (critical) and rough things. Therefore at first the desire of money,

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dein imperii, crevit: ea fuere quasi materies omnium malorum. Namque aviritia subvertit fidem,

then of command, increased: those were as if the source of all evils. For avarice overturned faith,

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probitatem, que caeteras bonas artes; pro his edocuit superbiam crudelitatem, negligere

honesty, and other good arts (qualities); instead of these it taught (them) pride, cruelty, to neglect

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deos, habere omnia venalia; ambitio subegit multos mortales fieri falsos; habere aliud

The gods, to have all things venal; ambition compelled many mortals to be made (become) false; to have one

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clausum in pectore, aliud promptum in lingua; aestumare amicitias que inimicitias non

(thing) shut up in the breast, another ready on (the) tongue; to estimate friendship, and enmities not

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ex re, sed ex commodo; que habere bonum vultum magis quam

according to thing (moral worth), but according to advantage; and to have a good (fair) countenance rather than (an honest)

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ingenium. Haec primo crescere paulatim, interdum vindicari. Post ubi contagio, quasi

disposition. These at first (began) to increase by degrees, sometimes to be punished. After wards when the contagion, as if

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pestilentia invasit, civitas immutata: imperium factum crudele que intolerandum,

a pestilence invaded (them), the state (was) changed: the government (was) made cruel and intolerable,

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ex justissimo que optumo. Sed primo ambitio exercebat animos hominum magis quam avaritia:

from the most just and the best. But at first ambition did exercise the minds of men more than avarice:

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